"HIP, HIP GOULET !

The Japanese theater has the felicitous custom of nominating people as "Living National Treasures. " He isn't Japanese, but Robert Goulet should certainly be named a Living National Treasure of our theater.His gorgeous voice seems untouched by time, and his dapper presence fills the stage."

NEW YORK POST -Clive Barnes La Cage aux Folles (Broadway 2005)

  

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 

Frank Scheck (2005)

When the dapper, well-dressed gentleman with the trademark mustache walks onstage at the Marquis Theatre, you can actually feel the wave of audience affection. That's because the actor in question, Robert Goulet, is a beloved Broadway and music veteran whose appearances on the Great White Way have become all too rare. Now playing the role of Georges, the straighter half of the gay couple in the Jerry Herman musical "La Cage Aux Folles," he infuses his performance with his trademark charm and iconic presence. Goulet well demonstrates that he still possessesa vivid leading-man presence.

THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER May 2, 2002

 

 

 

ACTING DISTINGUISHES ROBERT GOULET IN THE ROLE OF EMILE de BECQUE

"Although Goulet has made his reputation as a singer, it is his acting that distinguishes him in the role of Emile de Becque. A French planter on a South Pacific island on which the Navy establishes a base during World War II, de Becque falls in love with young Navy nurse Nellie Forbush, and Goulet combines worldly experience and boyish infatuation into an appealing character."

"This Nearly Was Mine,"demonstrates that he has lost none of his ability to deliver an emotionally potent song..."

 

THE ACTOR

 THE DETROIT NEWS  Tom Long 6/5/1997          

DON QUIXOTE IS A ‘DREAM’ ROLE FOR GOULET IN

‘MAN OF LA MANCHA’

Goulet takes the part of the addled Don Quixote, self-styled knight and protector of all that is virtuous and makes it completely his own. And why shouldn’t it be? Goulet is now 63, a perfect age to both play and understand the semidoddering Quixote, and yet he still has the sort of inherently regal bearing that made him the perfect Lancelot in Camelot nearly 40 years ago.  What is unexpected, though, it is the way Goulet is able to play against his own stereotype, moving from nobility to near senility with grace and humor. His Quixote can stand proudly but at the same time seems chomping up and down to adjust his false teeth. And Goulet reveals the sweet delusion behind Quixote unabashedly, though he never paints in the overly broad strokes that can make musicals torturous. "The Impossible Dream" a song that Goulet chooses to deliver in actual phrases, building instead of blaring from the beginning, and going out instead of up on the last note. Given Goulet’s pipes - which are in very good shape, indeed  - it’s an interesting approach that works nicely, landing the lyrics a power that might otherwise be washed over.  Goulet takes this old mantle, dusts it off and wears it well. Right now, who could wear it better?"